All posts by Charles Liu

Fact Checking US Government Propaganda On Maoming PX Protest Death

It is often said Chinese government propaganda like Xinhua, People’s Daily, are highly agendaed and utterly unreliable. But how about America’s government propaganda? Here’s a recent example as illustration.

Recently, news of protesters killed in Maoming over a chemical plant made suspicious rounds – only in the usual propaganda outlets, Radio Free Asia, Voice of America, and ancillary outlets like Epoch Times, Boxun. These accusations of Chinese government killing protesters were accompanied with photos of citizen laying on the ground bleeding. However, a quick Google image-based search revealed these photos are not from the PX plant protest, but were victims of violent crime elsewhere in China:

RFA used a photo from a hacking attack that occurred in 2012, and was subsequently regurgitated by Falun Gong outlets like Epoch Times:

RFAprop Wenzhoutruth

VOA used a photo from a hacking attack that occurred in 2013 that was then Echo Chambered by Boxun:

VOAprop Qinhaitruth

As a loyal tax payers I am completely disappointed by how my hard earned tax dollars are misused.

NYU and China Aid Fight Over Cheng Guangcheng And The “Human Rights” Turf

Chen GuangchengThe American Left hates China, the Right hates China, and Chen Guangcheng is stuck in the middle of two very passionate groups gunning to be the thought leader of America’s democracy battles and the war on China’s soul (or lack of):

– Last week, Chen Guangcheng accused NYU of kicking him out due to pressure from the Chinese government over NYU’s Shanghai campus plan.
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Opinion: China’s Acquisition of Smithfield Is A National Security Threat To America

[Please note this OpEd does not reflect the opinion of Hidden Harmonies, or even the author. It is a summarized survey of media coverage and netter comments in America.]

After getting their communist hands caught in the cookie jar with cyber espionage and covert theft of our technology and IP, the sneaky Communist Chinese are shifting tactics and resorting to overt acquisition of our safe, efficient pig husbandry and processing technologies to save their crumbling communist pork industry rife with disease, contamination, poison, censorship, lack of freedom.

They have to be stopped. Write to your congressman, boycott Communist-China-made products and turncoats who sell out to the communists. Burn all your possessions contaminated with Communist-China-made parts, like you and your neighbor’s cars (especially if they are ChiComs.) The evil Communist Chinese even force-feed Tibetan babies rotten pork (Tibetans abstain from pork as muslins) while wrapping them in flea blankets infested with smallpox.

Communist China is evil, we are great, USA, USA, USA…

Signed,

Freedom loving, patriotic but not nationalistic, America

[Unit] 61398, The New Number of The Beast

Earlier Black Phoenix wrote about the problem with Mandiant attributing the Comment Crew hacking to the Chinese military. The recent media frenzy around yet another “China hacking” story focused on a supposedly shadowy PLA military unit in Shanghai, Unit 61398, as the “state actor” behind the cyber attacks. Their primary source, Mandiant APT1 report, even cited the address of Unit 61398 central office as 208 Datong Road in Gaochao, Pudong.

Only problem is 208 Datong Raod is the address of a kindergarden run by the not-so-secret military unit, and is open to the public:

Star Baby review

– Here’s Star Baby, a preschool ratings site, giving Unit 61298 Preschool a favorable review:

http://www.starbaby.cn/jigou/1368-jieshao

– Here’s another preschool review site with photos of the potential “hackers”:

http://www.studyget.com/youeryuan/item-660.html

– No, this is not a picture of PLA hackers using children as human shields. The kindergarden was practicing emergency preparedness, probably in response to a school attack that occurred in China:

http://www.pudong-edu.sh.cn/web/pd/45322-450000032148.htm

Having never been to the place, I would conceed the nursery school COULD be a front for China’s premier cyber espionage center – saved the fact the school’s online registration information shows it is one of the schools in Pudong that accepts foreign families.

I hope cooler heads prevail. While it is reasonable to believe the Chinese probably is doing everything we’re doing, to pin this on the Chinese military requires more compelling evidence than bunch of toddlers running around.

Netters Speak Up Against Media Narrative On “Chinese iPhone Shopper Tasered” Story

[This is a follow-up to DeWang's Chinese iPhone shopper tasered and tackled story]

So being a repeat customer of Apple, or going to Apple Store to pick up products you already paid for online, may be dangerous to your health? Perhaps only if you are Chinese like Ms. Li, and don’t expect to receive much sympathy from the media. The news coverage this poor woman received so far is decidedly biased. Many sensationalized Nashua police department’s announcement she had $16,000 on her, in order to make the “black market scalper” smear stick. Fox News even gone as far as questioning if the woman was stealing American technology for China (note to Cavuto, these iPhones are made in China, and are available for sale in China.)

However, one can take comfort in the fact netters around the world have responded very differently than our supposedly impartial media. Here are some reader comments around the world, in defense of Ms. Li:
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The Retraction of Mike Daisey’s one-man show “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs” from ‘This American Life’

[Editor: this piece was co-written by Charles Liu and Allen]

To the credit of “This American Life” – a popular program on Public Radio International –  its producers over the weekend officially retracted its January airing of a version of Mike Daisy’s popular monologue titled “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,” in which Daisy described first-hand terrible work conditions at Foxconn, a key supplier to Apple’s iPad and iPhones. There were simply too much distortion and fabrications of facts to ignore.

Both Allen and I actually heard the show in January.  It made us sad and angry at the time – not because we knew something was wrong – but because we got the sense that the story was too sensationalized.  Mike Daisy did know how to tell a story, but much of it sounded hollow to us.  It was too dramatized. It was so gloomy – so dark – so unapologetically one-sided. Continue reading

Examining The Non-Existent “Rich Chinese Hunting Polar Bear” Story

Recently a story by Peter Simpson of Daily Mail UK made waves in the conservationist circle, that wealthy Chinese businessmen, as many as 100, are paying upwards of $80,000US to hunt endangered polar bears into extinction with this headline, “Rich Chinese Thrill Seekers Paying £50,000 for ‘trip of a lifetime…’ to kill endangered polar bears.”

The Daily Mail then followed up with an OpEd with the temerity to question how cruel the Chinese race is: “are the Chinese the cruelest race on earth?Continue reading

Li Daguang: “Non-aligned” policy does not mean China cannot make friends

[This is a translation courtesy of Charles Liu of a recent Op-Ed by LI Daguang]

李大光:中国 “不结盟” 并不意味着不结交朋友
LI Daguang: China’s “Non-aligned” Policy Does Not Mean She Cannot Make Friends

2012-02-27 08:34

摘要:结交朋友,特别是牢固的国家友好关系,有利于打破某些大国针对中国建立的包围圈。否则就会出现国家越来越强大了,朋友却越来越少了;国家越来越富裕了,但影响力却越来越小了。这是软实力不强的真实反映。

Abstract: Making friends, especially dependable international relations, have the benefit of breaking down certain containment against China by larger countries. Otherwise as China becomes stronger, friends become fewer, and as she becomes wealthier, influence declines. This is a true reflection of weak soft power. Continue reading

NYT says ‘Journalist Is Detained in China for Article on Sex Slaves,’ but journalist says not

The New York Times is at it again. For some recent expositions of their nutty ‘journalism’, make sure to also read:
1. “Fact Checking NYT’s Qi Chonghuai Jailed Journalist Story
2. “‘Catching Scent of Revolution, China Moves to Snip Jasmine’ – Retarded Government or Retarded NYT?

This time the NYT reporter, Andrew Jacobs, lies about a Chinese journalist being detained by Chinese police. How do we know? In fact, the journalist has come out to say that he wasn’t and that the NYT didn’t even interview him. Below is the NYT article and I show what a propaganda garbage it is. Read on. Continue reading

Fact Checking NYT’s Qi Chonghuai Jailed Journalist Story

Recently New York Times published a story on a jailed Chinese journalist Qi Chonghuai, and made some fairly severe, usual allegations (corruption, official misconduct, torture), and a new one – double jeopardy violation in resentencing Qi to more jail time for the crime he served 4 years already, because he vowed to continue to expose official graft.

Since it was written by Andrew Jacobs (someone I consider to be the grand wizard of NYT’s China reporting), and given NYT’s past record of biased reporting when it comes to China, I decided to dig into this story for details that might have been suppressed. Guess what? Continue reading

Translation: Betting on U.S. immigration officials to jump on this illegal “Jasmine Revolution” political refugee business soon

Couple months ago first words on the Chinese “Jasmine Revolution” appeared on an overseas Chinese political blog, Boxun, and has since led to much media hysteria in the West. Two individuals have come forth claiming credit for this call. Below is my translation of an article written by a Boxun forum user, 华龙(Hua Long), titled, “政治难民生意来了 谢万军、王军涛抢破头.” In English, that’d be, “Xie Wangjun, Wang Juntao Brawl Over Political Refugee Business.” Maybe the U.S. immigration officials ought to take a look. I will keep an eye out on how long this lasts. I will also inform if there is any peep from the Western media about this story but won’t hold my breadth.
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Pattern of Western Media Disinformation

Thanks to Web technologies (web archive, images search engine), the Chinese bloggers have once again called the Western media’s bluff on exaggerated reporting of China’s “Jasmine Revolution” non-event. Our prior post has highlighted Roland Soong’s recent article, “Fake Western Media Coverage Of Jasmine Revolution In China.” This has been a pattern.
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Chinese Shoppers Spend New Year’s In America

Times certainly are changing. As hundreds of millions Chinese travel for family reunion, increasing number are taking the time to go abroad and indulge themselves.

Chinese tourists have gone on shopping sprees to Japan and then Taiwan in recent years, since US visa is notoriously difficult to obtain (Chinese applicants are denial-based.) Now, it seems US is relaxing tourist visa rule to draw Chinese shoppers to America:
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Retarded U.S. media reporting Egypt protest news censored in China

No doubt many of us on HH have been paying attention to the Egypt news. But what caught my eyes recently is a slew of news reports accusing China of censoring the Egypt news (Time, WSJ, and Wired).

However, when I (and other bilingual readers) searched for news on Egypt in China – we discover it is not censored. Baidu, Tudou, Sina, CCTV all are carrying this story. Here’re some netter comments:

[Time] Jim: What rubbish. I live and work in China – am from America – and read about this every day ! The continued demonization of China is pathetic but worse filled with hyperbole and lies like this posting by a supplosedly legitimate news source. What crap.
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Lang Lang Responds To U.S. media “Anti-US” Accusations

Through his agent and his blog, Lang Lang responded to Chinese media about recent accusation promoted by the likes of Fox News that his choice of song for the White House state dinner performance was “anti-US.”  Below are my translations of some excerpts from an article carried on sina.com.cn of Lang Lang’s response.

郎朗回应在白宫所奏曲目争议:别把艺术政治化
Lang Lang Responds To White House Performance Controversy: Don’t Politicize Art

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(Letter) Translation: China Is The Most Targeted Country By Hackers

According to China’s network emergency response team, CNCERT, China is the most hacked nation in the world, and majority of the attack originate from United States.

China Is The Most Targeted Country By Hackers

[168 IT Safety] According to news sources, National Computer Network Emergency Response Team (CNCERT) center deputy directory Zhou Yonglin, on 1/22, CNCERT has not received “any concrete information regarding the incident from Google.” Continue reading

(Letter) Translation: Haiti Quake Headlines In Chinese Media

Here’re few headlines in Chinese media regarding Haiti earthquake:

中国国际救援队抵达海地太子港 – China International Rescue Reaches Port Au Prince

中国国际救援队在海地开展医疗救助 – China International Rescue Mission Begin Medical Aid

基础设施无法使用 海地震后救援面临巨大挑战 – Basic Services Lacking, Haiti Rescuers Face Daunting Challenge

中国8名在海地被埋维和人员下落不明 – Eight Peacekeepers In Haiti Remain Unaccounted

海地地震伤亡仍无法估计 全国1/3人口需紧急援助 – Haiti Quake Casualty Mounting, 1/3 Population Need Emergency Aid

郑州小姑娘捐稿费给海地灾民 – Zhengzhou Girl Donates Allowance To Haiti Victims

Here’s how how you can help.

(Letter) Translation: Chinese-American Military Service Experience In Contrast – Who Am I Fighting For

In contrast to the fairly positive reportng by Sichuan Online on overseas Chinese serving in US military, this article titled “Who Am I Fighting For” exposes a different view of life in the American military.

“Who Am I Fighting For” appeared in November 2008 issue of Siwen Times Digest, chronicled a Chinese graduate student’s entry into the Iraq war, and the deaths he witnessed on and off the battlefield:

http://bbs.51ielts.com/thread-513028-1-1.html

Who Am I Fighting For – A Chinese American Soldier’s Diary
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(Letter) Translation: “My American Soldier Diary” – Chengdu Man Serving In American Military

Below is a report from Sichuan Online, about a young man from Chengdu serving in US military, and his forum postings about his experience:

http://www.scol.com.cn/nsichuan/cddt/20091112/2009111282836.htm

“My American Soldier Diary” – Chengdu Man Serving In American Military: In Kuwait Reminiscing Jiouyanchao
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(Letter) Lou Jing, you had me at 80% – 100%

Just finished watching an interview with Lou Jing. She is an amazing young lady.

Other than the fact she doesn’t look like most other native Shanghainese, Lou is completely Chinese. The way she talks, attitude, is pretty much like any of my China-born nieces. She identifies with a cartoon pig who’s speciality is being ordinary.

She’s more Chinese than I will ever be.

Following is transcript of the 1st half of an interview Lou Jing gave Wangyi News:

WN: Lou Jing, what prompted you to enter the Eastern Angel contest?

LJ: Honestly, our teacher entered us into the contest. Some of my classmates and many in the drama school all went.

WN: How did you do?

LJ: I was really timid the first day. First try out there were 200 of us in the plaza stairway, waiting to be judged. Some people didn’t finish half their song and a bell would ring, telling them to stop. I was so nervous I called my mother – “mom, mom, you have to come, if you don’t come I can’t go thru with this” she was at work and she hurried over.

I did not make the show at first, only as a backup contestant. Two hours later they called and asked me to second try out. From preliminary to Shanghai final it took 7 days, then suddenly I realized, whoa, I’m in the final five.

WN: What score would you give yourself?

LJ: 80%, hehe. I’m more brave now.

WN: You’ve had couple nicknames since little, one is “Ganggang”?

LJ: Yeah “Ganggang”, means simpleton in Shanghainese.

WN: Why people call you that?

LJ: Because I’m the docile type. My Mom always tell me to be forgiving. When I thought I were being angry, my classmates say “is this it, you’re angry?” I can’t be angry at anyone, always like to help. Some people think I’m dumb, because my kindness isn’t always repaid. But I’m okay with that, what makes others happy makes me happy. That’s why they call me that.

NW: Another nickname is “little black”

LJ: Right, that’s because of my skin color. Some of my closer classmates call me that. Other people wouldn’t. Because we know each other well, since junior high. But strangely they wouldn’t let other people call me that, something like – “you can’t call her that, only we can.”

NW: Does that make you angry?

LJ: At first, then I’m used to it. Also when we were young people aren’t mean about it; they give me nickname, I give them nickname.

NW: We’ve seen some of your baby pictures, you always have such a big smile. When did you notice you were different than the other children?

LJ: In the city. You are not always in the same environment. If you’re in one place people get used to you. But if you go some place new, people would say your skin color is different, then I’m more self-conscious.

NW: Anything you are uncomfortable with?

LJ: Not when I was little, now maybe. It’s not obvious when you’re in familiar territory, but Once you’re somewhere new, people don’t know you – if I don’t talk it’s okay, but when I open my mouth people will ask me questions, then it’s like “not again”.

NW; you mentioned your skin color has brought you inconveniences, what inconvenences?

LJ: Not much when I was little. A lot on inconveniences now, especially after this contest, haha. I can’t recall what childhood inconveniences. Proverb goes “when god closes a door, he opens a window”. When I’m out, people always want to talk about me. Some are kind, some are not so kind and yell at me. I just let them talk.

People around me who know me are always nice to me, I thought that’s enough. Until after the contest I realized the world is not like that.

NW: Are there times you’re really angry with the impolite things people say about you?

JL: Does this contest count? Haha. During this contest, some media said irresponsible, untrue things. I feel put out, but us little people can’t really do anything about it.

NW: Anything happen druing the show?

JL: Sometimes. Like that KDS travel agency bad mouthing me, they had people visit the set. They comment about all five finalist’s look, and “black ape’ – I couldn’t care less. Let them talk. When you are on the show people will talk, you can’t shut their mouth.

NW: When You were little, you probably noticed other children have father but you don’t. When did you ask your mother about your father?

JL: About eight. I asked and Mom didn’t want to answer, so I stopped asking. I never do anything against my mother’s wish.

NW: When did your mother finally tell you about your background?

JL: On my 18th birthday. She casually mentioned it over cake, and I casually accepted it.

NW: were you a good kid?

JL: I think I was a good kid. I’d help my mom with greeting cards, cook dinner when she is late. I was a good kid, haha. I got good grades, teacher never called home to complain. Mom didn’t have to worry about me.

NW: You mentioned you were timid when you were little, don’t want to be noticed.

JL: When you are different and have to exist in the environment, you accept the fact you have to be invisible. You try not to attact attention. For example when teacher ask a question, I never raise my hand. Even when I know the answer I’d wish the teacher would pick me, then watch teacher pick some kid who doesn’t know the answer. I’m a very low key student, sitting in the back kind, haha.

NW: I read somewhere you used Maidou’s motto to describe yourself, “not dumb, but good natured”

JL: When my friend saw the Maidou movie, she called me and said “Lou Jing, this suits you, you’re not dumb, but good natured”, and I got upset “what are you talking about? I’m smart!” Then I thought this is true, I never cared about the little things. As long as everyone is happy, I’m okay. That’s why she describe me that way.

[Rest of the interview consists of her denying the online rumors. I will respect her wish and not focus on it.]

(Letter) Translation: Carbon Trading Prelude To Low Carbon Economy

Below is a short article on China’s state of Clean Development Mechanism(CDM) under Kyoto Protocol, and future of China’s low carbon, green development:

http://www.epciu.com/Html/0908/17/3471B33FF1937070.html

Carbon Trading Prelude To Low Carbon Economy

Environmental China, 8/17/2009

(Carbon trading market is a hopeful prelude to “low carbon economy”. Beijing Environmental Exchange CEO Mei Dewen says China, being the nation with largest carbon resource, has tremendous development potential in carbon trading. Thru Clean Development Mechanism, in 2012 China may receive 1.8 billion tons of carbon trading credit, as much as several hundred million USD.)

China’s carbon-based economy is a must, says Mei Dewen. Establishing exchange, develop products, speedy connection with international channels, Mei believes, developing market and pricing mechanism, attracting qualified financial institution and enterprises, is central to the future of carbon-based economy.

As 2005 Kyoto Protocol framework relates to China, in recent years, global carbon trading and marketplace had exponential growth, From 377 million Euro in 2004 to 91 billion Euro in 2008, with expert projection of 140 billion Euro in 2012, surpassing oil market as largest marketplace.

Carbon trading and derived financial market is on the horizon. According to World Bank’s estimate, half of the 5 billion ton emission reduction target by developed nations will be realized from CDM, and China have the potential for 35% to 40% of the global CDM.

However, financial development area is lacking, Mei Dewen says. Although China has the largest carbon capital, carbon economy and carbon trading are left and rigt legs, without support from carbon economy, China will lose out on carbon trading like pricing mechanism, and lose out on opportunity in development of new financial sector.
Currently, carbon trading is mostly monopolized by developed nations, such as ETS in EU, ETG in UK, and CCX in US. Although China has established environmental exchanges in Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjing, these 3 exchanges are limited to conservation and environmental protection technology transfer transactions, and still far from monetizing on carbon trading. China’s carbon marketplace development not only far behind developed nation, it’s even behind India.

In concrete terms, China’s carbon trading is akin to farm commodity market, while India’s carbon trading has elevated to level of currency market. Mei says, India’s carbon marketplace development is more advanced than China, in terms of trading platform or CDM capability. India’s carbon credit is 2-3 Euros more per ton than China.

(Letter) Four In Urumqi Indicted Over Needling Pedestrian

Four In Urumqi Indicted Over Needling Pedestrian:

According to Xinhua News on 9/7, prosecutors in Urumqi indicted 4 people over Shaoximen needling case on 9/3. This is the second case of needling the Urumqi prosecutors have filed.

Suspects Abdul-Rusuli Abdul-Kedl, Abdul-Rahman Abdul-Razzaq, Abdul-Keyoumu Abdul-Aufu, Abdul-mithi Mamati, around 9/3 10:30 followed a woman (surname Lee) into pedestrian underpass in Urumqi’s Shaoximen area. When they passed Lee, Abdul-Rusuli Abdul-Kedl with help of three others, stabbed Lee’s neck with a hyperdermic needle.

Withe the help of the crowd, the four were caught at the scene. On the 3rd they were detained by Urumqi police on the charge of endangering public safety. On the 7th, the case was moved to the prosecutors, and the four were offcially arrested. Urumqi police carried out the order on the 7th.

Urumqi prosecutors said, these four suspect ignored established laws, needling women in the public, severely distrupted social order with serious consquences. A crime has clearly taken place, with concrete evidence.

(Letter) Engdahl: Washington Is Playing a Deeper Game with China

Journalist and historian William Engdahl lays out his case for the origin of Urumqi riot:

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=14327

After the tragic events of July 5 in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in China, it would be useful to look more closely into the actual role of the US Government’s ”independent“ NGO, the National Endowment for Democracy (NED). All indications are that the US Government, once more acting through its “private” Non-Governmental Organization, the NED, is massively intervening into the internal politics of China.

The reasons for Washington’s intervention into Xinjiang affairs seems to have little to do with concerns over alleged human rights abuses by Beijing authorities against Uyghur people. It seems rather to have very much to do with the strategic geopolitical location of Xinjiang on the Eurasian landmass and its strategic importance for China’s future economic and energy cooperation with Russia, Kazakhastan and other Central Asia states of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. Continue reading

(Letter) Straight Times: Three Blade Weilding Uyghurs Shot

According to this AFP report three men disrupted prayer service, attacked  an unarmed police inside the mosque, before they were shot by armed police outside the mosque. Two died one injured:

http://www.straitstimes.com/Breaking%2BNews/Asia/Story/STIStory_402959.html/

BEIJING – THREE Uighur men tried to incite other Muslims to launch a ‘jihad’ and attacked a mosque security guard before police shot and killed two of them, state media reported on Tuesday.

The incident began when around 150 Muslims were praying in a mosque in Urumqi, the capital of the northwest Xinjiang region on Monday, Xinhua news agency said, citing an unnamed imam who was giving a service at the time.

One man stood up and tried to take over the prayers but was stopped, the imam told Xinhua. A few minutes later the man reportedly stood up holding a green banner and started calling for a ‘jihad’.

The imam then ended the prayers, adding: ‘We will definitely not follow you. Get out!”, according to Xinhua.

As the man was being ordered from the mosque, two other men took out three 50 centimetre long knives from a bag, Xinhua said.

Security guards then tried to stop the men. One of the guards, aged in his 40s who did not want to give his name, said the group chased him out of the mosque wielding the knives where they met patrolling police, Xinhua said.

Police fired warnings shots to try to stop the men before shooting at the three, killing two and injuring one.

A government statement released on Monday soon after the attack said: ‘Police shot and killed two suspected lawbreakers and injured one suspected lawbreaker using legal means.’ The statement said the three Uighurs were trying to attack another person from the Uighur minority group.

The government’s statement and the Xinhua report conflicted with accounts by two Uighurs who said they witnessed the incident from 50 metres away and that three Uighur men had been trying to attack security forces. ‘They hacked at the soldiers with big knives and then they were shot,’ said one of the witnesses, who said the incident took place across the street from a mosque.

The incident showed the city remained volatile despite a huge security clampdown following unrest on July 5 which left more than 180 people dead, in the worst ethnic violence to hit the country in decades. Thousands of Han Chinese retaliated in the following days, arming themselves with makeshift weapons. Despite a hefty security presence, authorities have since struggled to keep a lid on sporadic violence. — AFP