Archive

Archive for January, 2010

(Letter from pug_ster) China-US relations at all time low?

January 31st, 2010 96 comments

About 5 months ago, Jon huntsman was interviewed by Wall Street Journal and seems positive to bring China-US relations to the ‘next level’ as mentioned in my piece here.

January was a bad month between China-US relations. First there was the google incident. Then the US announced the $6.4 billion in arms to Taiwan. Now China wants the beloved panda Tai-Shan back (I’m kidding about the Tai-Shan part.) Though the arms sales seems to be the straw that broke the camel’s back. If you go to Chinadaily’s website, there is no less than 10 articles and opinions about this spat. Read more…

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , , , ,

(Letter) Translation: China Is The Most Targeted Country By Hackers

January 26th, 2010 No comments

According to China’s network emergency response team, CNCERT, China is the most hacked nation in the world, and majority of the attack originate from United States.

China Is The Most Targeted Country By Hackers

[168 IT Safety] According to news sources, National Computer Network Emergency Response Team (CNCERT) center deputy directory Zhou Yonglin, on 1/22, CNCERT has not received “any concrete information regarding the incident from Google.” Read more…

Categories: Letters Tags: , ,

Google vs. China – Good vs. Evil?

January 25th, 2010 86 comments

Google’s recent drama in China has endeared itself to some human rights activists, democracy advocates, even Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  Many have applauded Google for taking a “principled stance” against the evil empire of China.  I find such rhetoric comical. Read more…

"茉莉花 (Molihua)" / "Jasmine Flower," a piece of Chinese culture that has taken root around the world

January 19th, 2010 5 comments

Chinese culture is rich and amazing. Did you know that the main melody at the 2008 Beijing Olympics medal ceremonies were composed using only musical instruments that were made 2,450 years ago? That melody was a version of “茉莉花” or “Jasmine Flower.” It was adapted by famous Chinese composer Tan Dun and Wang Hesheng (of the Chinese Army orchestra) using the ancient instruments for the 2008 Olympics medal ceremonies. According to this China Daily article, “Classical piece will ring in ears of winners“:

“The main melody, which Tan described as “glorious, heartwarming and full of respect”, was recorded using the digital recording of a 2,450-year-old bell set excavated from a site in Hubei.”

Read more…

Categories: culture, music Tags: ,

From Bows to Vows: Chinese Ministry of Civil Affairs Issue Recommended Wedding Vows

January 15th, 2010 8 comments

(If this one by General Song Zuying Mr. Sha Baoliang gives you goose bumps, visit here for an earlier version of the same song)

In America, I haven’t seen anybody getting married without an exchange of vows that goes something like this: “I, (Bride / Groom), take you (Groom / Bride), to be my (wife / husband), to have and to hold from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish; from this day forward until death do us part. “

Traditionally Chinese wedding does not have such formal vows.  The newly-weds just have three bows during a wedding, usually announced by a wedding host:  “First, bow to the heaven and earth; second, bow to the parents; third, bow to each other!”  Read more…

Categories: News Tags:

(Letter) Translation: Haiti Quake Headlines In Chinese Media

January 15th, 2010 2 comments
Categories: natural disaster Tags: ,

Learning about the Chinese Mind through Chinese Food

January 13th, 2010 22 comments

This may not be a profound truth that I just discovered, but have you noticed that Chinese food and Chinese thinking have a lot to do with each other? Obvious as it may seem, one can become more reflective after encounters with another type of food and thinking behind it. In my case, the comparison is between China and America.

1. In cooking we don’t have “1 cup”, “1/4 cup”, “1 teaspoon” measurement, we say “a little salt”. Exactly how little is little, it’s all a matter of exposure (to other cooks), exchange (of experience) and experience (of your own practice). We don’t have “preheat oven to 425 degrees” either, we say “small fire”, “medium fire”, “”big fire”. Scratch your head and think what these mean. The Chinese mind is similarly conditioned to process such chaotic vagueness with ease and patience.

Read more…

Categories: culture, education Tags:

Google – A New Approach to China

January 13th, 2010 206 comments

Google issued a press release on their blog just a few hours ago pertaining to their operation in China. It is big news and will take some time to digest. I don’t want to comment, just get the story out.  Read more…

Haier does true wireless HDTV

January 7th, 2010 22 comments

Haiers true wireless HDTV (gizmodo.com)

Haier's true wireless HDTV (gizmodo.com)


The word “wireless” has really become an oxymoron. For example, are cell phones really wireless? Not really, because without a charging cable, cell phones are useless. At the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Haier has demonstrated a true wireless HDTV. No wires. No power cable.
Read more…

Categories: economy, technology Tags:

Xinhua: "China-ASEAN free trade area starts operation"

January 2nd, 2010 65 comments

When I started following the China-ASEAN free trade agreement few years ago, I knew they were on an accelerated pace, and I knew this day would come. This is such an awesome start for 2010! I have no doubt ASEAN+China will eventually extend to ASEAN+China+Japan+Korea. Here is Xinhua’s report, “China-ASEAN free trade area starts operation“:
Read more…

Categories: Asian Union, economy Tags: