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Posts Tagged ‘tiananmen’

Beware: The Ghost of Tiananmen is Coming to America.

June 1st, 2020 3 comments

As we get closer to the infamous date that many westerners would like to remember about tanks running around Tiananmen Square, I would like to remind why the events leading it in the first place. In case if you are brainwashed by western propaganda, the Chinese in early 1989 at the time saw rampant inflation and the Chinese government at the time weaning people out from the Iron Rice Bowl. Some people are simply disgusted how corrupt officials get rich while many other people suffer, especially academics. I rather not get into the details of this, but when the government doesn’t listen to the demands of its people, the government loses its legitimacy.

Fast forward today in America. America has been socialist for the Rich thanks to the bailout during the financial crisis, thanks to Obama.  This snake oil salesman president also crushed the occupy wall street movement by the way. President Trump made it worse by giving rich people tax breaks. He bungled covid-19 response and gave the rich tax breaks and gave the poor the scraps. What stuck me to write this article is that the pro-business CNBC knows that this is happening.

Many Americans stuck at home, jobless, see their business evaporate, seeing many minorities die while the stock market went sky high, big businesses getting bigger. There is enough kindling out there to start the fire and the death of George Floyd is just the catalyst. If George Floyd was killed 6 months ago, the response will not be so intense.

Like what happened in early 1989 in China where its people questioned the legitimacy of its government, I think today many Americans have the same feeling. Do they care if some local stores get looted or burnt down? Probably not. Meanwhile, Trump floated the idea about sending out the military to quell the protests. Let’s hope that June 4th will not be an ominous day in America just like in China. Then again, president Trump, the elites and western media are blind thinking that these riots and protests are really about a racial problem and firing police officers and putting them in jail will solve the problem, I think they are wrong.

The Justification of Violence and Terrorism?

November 7th, 2013 5 comments

Shohret Hoshur

Radio Free Asia Uyghur service broadcaster Shohret Hoshur, gold medal winner at the 2012 New York Festivals radio awards in the category of best coverage of a breaking news story.

Today, I came across an article in Asia Times titled “Tiananmen Crash Linked to Xinjiang Mosque Raid” by Shohret Hoshur, originally published via Radio Free Asia’s Uyghur Service.  In the article Hoshur appears to justify violence and terrorism committed last week by presenting what must appear to him to be legitimate motivations for plowing a car into the guardrails in Tiananmen Square (which resulted in an explosion) last week .

For Hoshur, this event was less about terrorism – as the Chinese government asserts – and more about the desperate acts of another politically disenchanted Uighur.  While Hoshur is careful to say this is not organized violence (this would hurt the cause for Uighur independence), he also elevated it from mere spiteful acts of pitiful personal grievance (this would be uninteresting) to a symbolic peoples’ revolt (this is the happy, sweet medium).

Hoshur’s article is copied below: Read more…

且谈1989年的天安门事件

(这篇文章是龙信明博客写的. 西方媒体总是会通过扭曲的镜头来看中国、 或中国人。关于六四, 西方媒体还在撒谎. 他们的目标是中国境内挑拨.)

且谈1989年的天安门事件我的小道消息比你的准

  • 对一般西方人而言,在中国,没有哪个地方比天安门更深刻地印在他们的意识中,也没有哪个历史事件比1989年的学生示威更经常地成为谈资。

    最近有个博客提到:“又到六月了。又是重访天安门的时候了。”看起来的确如此。大部分西方媒体都在筹备这一事件的“周年报道”,或者是通过再现戏剧性事件的形式来炮制新闻,或者是出于某种不见得那么高尚的目的。

Read more…

Let’s Talk About Tiananmen Square, 1989

(Propaganda in the Western press had a lasting impact on China. For the Tiananmen Protest of 1989, the “reform and opening up” policies under Deng back-stepped when Western governments decided to scale back loans and FDI into China on the grounds the Chinese government were ‘butchers.’ The ‘butcher’ and ‘massacre’ narratives were concocted by the Western press to demonize the Chinese government (an on-going trend, by the way; see collective defamation). Through Wikileaks, we now know the U.S. government knew then what were the actual truth and confirmed China’s version of the event. The Western press lied all along, as the following excellent analysis by 龙信明 (original, here) pieces together how they systematically distorted truth to defame. Warning: some graphic images of burnt bodies.)

Let’s Talk About Tiananmen Square, 1989My Hearsay is Better Than Your Hearsay
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June Fourth 1989, another look

June 4th, 2011 33 comments

It has been 22 years since the June 4, 1989 Tiananmen incident. While the Western media has over the years toned down this ‘massacre’ myth, they are still using vague language to keep the ‘massacre’ narrative alive. For example, even NPR’s ‘anniversary’ piece yesterday, echoing an Associated Press article, described it as “the crushing of the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement.”

With declassified U.S. government documents and other Westerner accounts, Gregory Clark in this well researched 2008 article published in the Japan Times, “Birth of a massacre myth,” explained how the New York Times and other Western media were still pushing that narrative despite all evidence concluding otherwise. Recent Wikileaked U.S. embassy cables also showed the U.S. government knew there was no bloodshed in Tiananmen Square [editor: link updated on 3/19/2012 from vancouversun – which became unreachable – to telegraph link]. Apparently, condemning China is okay while lying along with the media. Read more…

How a Chinese photographer sees Tiananmen Square

February 28th, 2010 5 comments

“Tiananmen Square” conjures up a great deal of negativity in the West about China, and most people in the West remembers it as the site for the 1989 protest. A picture is certainly worth a thousand words, and today, I’ve come across one taken by a personal friend, Ming, of Tiananmen Square (with his artistic photo retouching), where the place is functional, alive, and colorful. This image is a reminder for me that the Chinese people have largely “moved on” regarding Tiananmen, but most in the West are still stuck in 1989; a reminder of the gap in the view of the world between the Chinese and the West.

Categories: Opinion, Photos Tags:

Iran & China: Is World Press Coverage Similar or Different?

June 22nd, 2009 55 comments

i38_19379493 Events of the last week in Iran have been widely reported by the world press. Not long before, the press also reported on the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square incident of 1989. Were these two distinct events reported in a similar manner or were they treated as different and unique events? Let’s take a look at each and see what we can find.

1) Who are the good guys and who are the bad guys?

Based on the coverage I’ve seen, both governments were cast as being in the wrong and both protest movements as in the right. In the case of China, the government sent in tanks and used live ammunition to break up a protest movement that was alleged to have turned violent. Most of the reporters in the world press were located in or near the same area, and their reports reflected what occurred in that vicinity. Analyzes of this event in most cases pointed to the government as the culprit and the demonstrators as being victims and responding in a suitable fashion. Is this an accurate assessment? The Chinese government attempted to confiscate film of the event from foreign sources but those attempts were successfully evaded in most instances.

Read more…

Green Dam-Youth Escort

June 16th, 2009 117 comments

China Internet

It seems the western media and Chinese blogosphere agree on one thing; Green Dam is not winning any popularity contests. Today, the Chinese government backed down on the mandatory usage of the software, though it will still come either pre-loaded or be included on a compact disc with all PCs sold on the  mainland from July 1st.

There are several problems associated with this software, each one an interesting topic in itself. I’d like to run down the issues associated with its release, one by one.

1) Why the sudden announcement of this invasive software with virtually no implementation time given to the manufacturers?
Read more…

On my way to school, I saw beautiful flowers

June 4th, 2009 222 comments

admin’s note: As Nimrod commented in an early thread, “the tankman photo was a snapshot …, the whole incident is a lot more powerful than the snapshot; in the same way that the whole 1989 movement makes a more powerful statement than the snapshot of 6/4.” Previously, we posted personal accounts of students from Tianjin or Shanghai to give readers a taste of the spread, both in terms of time and space, of the 1989 student movement. Today, we post an account from a student in Beijing on what he saw on that fateful day 20 years ago. Needless to say, the views on the movement among the participates have diverged and shifted considerably over the past 20 years. However, the raw emotions we felt on that day, shock, anger, confusion, and above all, profound sadness, are afresh in our minds on this anniversary.

My Daughter, who is in the first grade, was reading her homework to me, “On My way to school, I saw beautiful flowers. Some flowers were hanging on stems …”

“That’s very good” I said.

“Others felt on the grass after a thunderstorm, but they are still beautiful” She continued.

“Yes, they are.”

Every life is a flower. Twenty years ago, in the morning of June 4th, 2009, I saw flowers fell.
Read more…

Categories: politics Tags: , ,

(Letter) Web search for Tiananmen not censored, but do people care?

April 21st, 2009 No comments

As a readers of China blogs for quite some times, I’ve read my fair share of reports of Tiananmen being a taboo subject in China, and a sensitive terms that’s filtered by the Chinese government’s GFW (here, here).

But those reporting filtering/censorship seem to have categorically fell silent when it appears the term “Tiananmen 64” (in Chinese and English) is not being filtered. For what reason or motive, I don’t know – but there appears to be zero, I mean, ZERO follow-up on this appearant good news.

Anyway, here’re what appear to be uncensored search results from two major Chinese-language search engines:

Sohu (Chinese, English)

Baidu (Chinese, English)

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , , ,

Tiananmen at sunrise

July 26th, 2008 14 comments

With a jet-lagged baby, I thought this morning would be the perfect time to attend one of my favorite events in Beijing: watching the raising of the national flag on Tiananmen square.  It is a daily ritual at sunrise, but always thrilling with its simplicity, elegance; I’ve only attended a few times (emphasis: sunrise), and always found it deeply moving. 

Here’s a video, from 5/19, when the flag was lowered to half-staff to remember the victims of the Wenchuan earthquake:  (Why isn’t it a video of my trip? Explanation below.)

Read more…

Categories: culture, video Tags: , ,