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Posts Tagged ‘xinjiang’

Lies and Truth about XinJiang’s “Concentration Camps”

September 12th, 2020 1 comment

Without much adieu, please take a good look at this short documentary from CGTN linked above. It’s about China’s take on its “War on Terror” in XinJiang. Compare China’s approach to the West’s own “internally” and “externally” (over US $6 trillion and over 1.3 million lives)

Go ahead – take the first steps to taking the red pills to escape from the MSM and US government propaganda about China … and much of the world…

«Honored by the U.S. Department of State»

August 8th, 2020 No comments

Sayragul Sauytbay/Сайрагүл Сауытбай was by the U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on 4 March 2020 given the «International Woman of Courage»-award (IWOC), an American award presented annually by the U.S. Department of State (mainly to opposition figures in other countries), https://www.state.gov/secretary-of-states-international-women-of-courage-award/

Image from state.gov

Besides on Jun 22, 2020 the book «Die Kronzeugin: Eine Staatsbeamtin über ihre Flucht aus der Hölle der Lager und Chinas Griff nach der Weltherrschaft» by Sayragul Sauytbay and German journalist Alexandra Cavelius was published on «Europaverlag. And «Scribe Publishers», a publisher in the United States, is going to translate and published the book in the UK, the US and Australia in May 2021 under the title «The Chief Witness: Escape from China’s Modern-Day Concentration Camps», https://www.dw.com/en/how-china-is-destroying-kazakh-culture/a-54434930

Journalist Alexandra Cavelius has earlier cooperated with Rebiya Kadeer, former president of World Uyghur Congress, on writing the book: «Rebiya Kadeer, Alexandra Cavelius: Die Himmelsstürmerin, Chinas Staatsfeindin Nr.1 erzählt aus ihrem Leben» (Verlagsgruppe Random House, 2007). and with the English version: «Dragon Fighter: One Woman’s Epic Struggle for Peace With China» (Kales Press, 2009)

Earlier in 2013 U.S. Department of State had given a similar «IWOC»-award to Chinese Tibetan Tsering Woeser.

A sum of money probably follows the award, but that is not stated at the web-site of the U.S. Department of State.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: ,

Embracing Islamic terrorism

January 21st, 2020 No comments

Chris Kanthan has just published an article called «Embracing Islamic terrorism». The article, together with 23 links, is a shocking and well-documented review on American foreign policy:

https://www.nationofchange.org/2017/05/28/embracing-islamic-terrorism/

  • In link number 3 John Kerry, at that time US Secretary of State, says: «They (the Syrian government) are targeted by the opposition, who we are arming and training […] What we are trying to do is help Syrians to fight for their own country. And we have been spending a lot of money, a lot of effort to try to help do this.» Kerry’s comments came at a meeting that took place at the Dutch Mission to the United Nations on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly in September 2016.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdVa5qoh_80
  • Link 7: What did American vice president Joe Biden say in 2015: «Our biggest problem is our allies … the Turks … the Saudis, the Emirates et cetera. What were they doing? They were so determined to take down Assad … What did they do? They poured hundred of millions of dollars, ten thousand of tons of weapons into anyone who would fight against Assad. Except that the people who were being supplied were al-Nusra and al-Qaeda and extremist elements of jihadists coming from other parts of the world! So you think I am exaggerating?»: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOf7jzc7faY
  • Link 10 is a telegram written by US Secretary of State 30/12-2009: «Saudi Arabia remains a critical financial support base for al-Qa’ida, the Taliban, LeT, and other terrorist groups, including Hamas, which probably raise millions of dollars annually from Saudi sources, often during Hajj and Ramadan.» LeT is Urdu for «Lashkar-e-Taiba», literally Army of Good, one of the most active Islamist terrorist organizations in South Asia. https://wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/09STATE131801_a.html
  • Link 15 was a video with the title «Kill Shiites, Christians and Jews» – Textbooks for kids in Saudi Arabia (25/5-2017), but it can’t any longer be found at YouTube.

At the end of his article Chris Kanthan also mentions the problems with terrorism in China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , , ,

Xinjiang in the News Again … as Political Islam is Ignored Yet Again

June 25th, 2015 14 comments

So Xinjiang in on the Western news again.  In the last few days, articles have appeared at Reuters, Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor, to name just a few…

Here is an excerpt from the Christian Science Monitor: Read more…

Propaganda sprinkling

August 14th, 2011 51 comments

After first reading this article from the Associated Press (echoed by the NPR), I thought, well, it seems to be all facts based. Over the years, I have come to realize critical thinking is required when consuming Western press. Read the left column through first before reading my comments on the right.  Try to ignore my highlighting.  Let me know if you think I am being too critical.  Did my points of contention jump out at you during your initial reading? Read more…

Global Times: “Blood stains the Silk Road”

August 6th, 2011 30 comments

A group of security forces patrol central Kashi, Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region on Tuesday. (Global Times)

Global Times carried some really good coverage of the recent attacks in Kashgar, shedding light on the tension in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

Rest of this post is really just the Global Times article itself. That one idea I feel deserves still extra mentioning is the fact that people when feeling there is nothing to loose, will tend to engage in more extremist behavior. Thus, I feel China must continue her path of economic progress. Integrating young ethnic Uyghurs and helping them gain employment is a great idea. Perhaps America will learn to do that with Black youths from inner cities and Natives from Indian reservations across the country too.
Read more…

(Letter from pug_ster) National Geographic got into the propaganda act?

November 22nd, 2009 271 comments

Saw an interesting blog of some brave woman who took great risks of taking a picture of 2 Uyghur ‘protesters’ before they got shot Chinese police. It even have a colorful story with it:

Writer Matthew Teague photographed these Uygur men, advancing upon Chinese forces, moments before they were shot.

Many people carry cameras these days. Some have uncommon courage. On page 36 of this issue, in the story “The Other Tibet,” there is a photograph taken with a cell phone. The photographer was not a professional. She was a Uygur woman who documented the shooting of a Uygur man by Chinese security forces on a street in Urumqi, capital of China’s Xinjiang region. She later gave the picture to National Geographic’s photographer Carolyn Drake.

Like their Tibetan neighbors, the Uygurs have a history of struggle, but when Carolyn began covering them more than a year ago, she had no idea that the conflict would explode into one of China’s most deadly uprisings since the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989. By June of this year, she thought her coverage was finished; she returned home to Istanbul. Then hints of unrest began to filter back to her. “At first I didn’t realize the severity of it. I started sending emails to my translator and friends in Kashgar, Hotan, and Urumqi, but no one responded.” She anxiously searched news sources, but the picture of what was going on seemed incomplete and unclear. There was only one way to fi nd out: return to China. She did so in July.

Carolyn, writer Matthew Teague, and a Uygur woman with a cell phone camera all took great risks to bring us the story of a struggle for human rights. Many people carry cameras these days. Sometimes they help us find the truth.

Yes, sounds like the human rights abuse Chinese police are at it again. If picture is worth a thousands words, maybe the picture would better explain why.

http://blogs.ngm.com/blog_central/2009/11/editors-note-uncommon-courage-2.html [updated 2011-12-31; originally at this link]

Of course the blog is a story about the ‘human rights’ struggles in Xinjiang and the July 5 protests.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/12/uygurs/teague-text

Even in the colorful story in the National Geographic magazine, they didn’t explain about how the so called ‘protests’ got ugly and almost 200 people died, namely by those knife wielding maniacs whom National Geographic refers them as ‘protesters.’

I have seen some other propagandized reporting such as this:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/oct/22/china-executes-tibet-protesters

But this National Geographic article takes the cake.

The mathematics of 10,000 disappearing Uighurs: refuting a refutation of Kadeer's claim

August 5th, 2009 154 comments

In recent days, there have been widespread and unchallenged reports of Rebiya Kadeer’s accusation in Japan that 10,000 Uighurs disappeared overnight in Urumqi on July 5. I can not find a transcript of Ms. Kadeer’s press conference speech. The following, from the Guardian, is one of the more detailed and also seemingly the most critical account of her accusation:

“Almost 10,000 people attending the protests in Urumqi disappeared in one night,” Kadeer, president of the pro-independence World Uighur Congress, said. “Where did they go? If they died, where are their bodies? If they were detained, where are they being held?”

It was unclear where Kadeer got her numbers from.

Read more…

Categories: General Tags: , , ,

Chinese Directors Withdraw from Australian Film Festival

July 25th, 2009 134 comments

This week, several Chinese directors, including world-renowed independent film director Jia Zhangke, abruptly withdrew their works from screening at the upcoming Melbourne International Film Festival, which starts today and runs through Aug. 9. Organizers of the Melbourne International Film Festival touts the festaival as “a feast of cinematic delicacies from over 50 countries,” making this result that much more tragic. Read more…

(Letter from Hohhot, Opposing Viewpoint) Xinjiang, Tibet, beyond: China’s ethnic relations

July 23rd, 2009 161 comments

unity

The ethnic protests and clashes in China’s westernmost region of Xinjiang on 5-6 July 2009 and the following days have caused around 200 deaths. The deadly violence, mainly between the Uyghur (and Muslim) population and the Han Chinese – but also involving the security forces killing some protesting Uyghurs, in circumstances that are not yet clear – has shocked and polarised public opinion across China. They have also focused renewed attention on the sensitive and complex theme of the relationship between different ethnic groups in the People’s Republic of China.
Read more…

(Letter from may) Translation: Letter from Xinjiang – Reflections on the Xinjiang Problem

July 13th, 2009 116 comments

The letter was written to Mr. Ruan Yunfei 冉云飞, a well-known Chinese writer and blogger, by someone from a very small minority group in Xinjiang after the Urumqi Incident. It provides a unique perspective into the ethnic relations in the region. It is unique because the author is neither Han nor Uighur and the voice from smaller minority groups in Xinjiang is seldom heard. The author expresses her views with extraordinary candidacy and courage.

I thank Mr. Ran for helping me contact the author. I am very grateful to the author who gave me permission to translate the letter and publish it on the Fool’s Mountain. She also worked with me patiently in the past few days to clarify many points in the letter. Our communication is reflected in the translation and the notes at the end of the letter.

The author wants the readers to know that the information she provided in her letter about the policies and conditions of ethnic minority eduction reflects her experience in a particular university and at a particular time (early 2000) in Xinjiang. The author does not claim to know situations in every universities in Xinjiang or in the whole country. Readers should be careful when making generalizations. She also said there might be some changes in the policies and conditions of ethnic minority eduction in recent years that she is not aware of.

The original letter is here.

Letter from Xinjiang – Reflections on the Xinjiang Issue
Read more…

Uighurs and population control in Xinjiang

July 11th, 2009 73 comments

Amid all the debates regarding how and to what extend Uighurs benefited or suffered from preferential policies or discriminations in Xinjiang, there is much confusion in one particular subject. Namely, are Uighurs subject to the (in)famous population control regulation (AKA family planning)? And if so, what kind of restrictions do they face? This post tries to answer these questions with some concrete details.

Update: According to reading notes from Chistiane Reinhold, Uighurs were exempted from family planning till 1988.
Read more…

Two restraints + one leniency = a backfiring minority policy on all

July 8th, 2009 55 comments


Note: This post is a selective and partial translation of an article written by a second generation Han “settler” born and raised in Xinjiang. That article is titled “一个兵团二代的网文:告诉你真实的乌鲁木齐” (A net article by a 2nd generation Bingtuan kid: let me tell you the real Urumqi). It is a long and detailed account of the author’s memory of growth of and growing up in Urumqi as well as his perspectives on when and how race relationship between Uighur and Han deteriorated. It is a highly recommended read.


Update: Tian, via a comment at Telegraph, provided a short summary of the article referred above. That summary is appended at the end of this post.

Read more…

Chinese Ethnic Policies and the Affirmative Action: One Rationale, Two Failures

July 7th, 2009 56 comments

Recent riots in Urumqi have been attributed by the Chinese government to the instigation of Rebiya Kadeer and her World Uyghur Congress. This may distract from a potential public debate on ethnic policies that badly need reform.

Years ago, in a high school politics class, I heard our teacher tell us a story about a Han soldier in Tibet. When this soldier saw broken pieces of human body being exposed at mountaintop and pecked at by birds of prey, not knowing this is a part of the Tibeten “sky burial”, Read more…

Categories: General Tags: ,

Violence in Urumqi – Details still Sketchy

July 6th, 2009 428 comments

Chinese media has been reporting what appear to be ethnically-motivated riots in Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang.  Xinhua reports that casualty may have reached 140, with more injured.

Western press have also latched onto the story. Here is the latest report from the Wall Street Journal. Read more…

Uygur BBS back online

September 4th, 2008 24 comments

Uighur-Online, a gathering place for many minority voices in Xinjiang that has often pushed the limits of political speech in China, is again available online (连接).

Read more…

Categories: News Tags: , , ,

Maimaiti's 2008

June 17th, 2008 6 comments

Today’s news is that the Olympic torch has arrived in Xinjiang province. As widely reported in the Western press, the Xinjiang government encouraged people to watch at home on TV due to security concerns. In addition to schools and offices that organized groups to support the torch, many private Chinese still chose to come on the streets. Tianya has reports from some excited eyewitnesses.

In honor of the torch’s visit to Xinjiang, let me introduce a domestic movie that combines three of our favorite topics: football, Olympics, and minorities! Maimaiti’s 2008 is a movie about a group of kids in Turfan, on the edge of the Taklamakan desert. In order to inspire them, their young football coach Maimaiti tells them a little lie: a win in the district finals will translate into a visit to the Opening Ceremonies of the Beijing Olympics.

Here’s the trailer:

Read more…

Categories: culture Tags: , , ,

Kristof on Xinjiang: Terrorism and the Olympics

May 29th, 2008 22 comments

Nick Kristof continues his quest in search of topics that should be “sensitive” to Chinese by heading to Xinjiang where he found little to write about. This follows earlier editorials on Tibet that we discussed here and here.

On his blog, he tries to incite commentary with these questions:

Especially for those of you in China, do you expect the Olympics to go smoothly? Do you worry about the terror threat from Xinjiang?

My response (submitted as a comment on his blog) is here:

Read more…

Categories: media Tags: , ,