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Archive for April, 2010

上海世博会 2010 (Shanghai World Expo 2010) Opening Ceremony

April 30th, 2010 No comments

中国博客: “探索和谐”, 欢迎你

April 30th, 2010 13 comments

大家好.  从今年二月十四日以来, 我们都在找机会用中文来介绍这个中国博客, “探索和谐.”  我们的中文是真的非常差.   不过, 我们觉得用最简单的字还可以表达心里的话.  我们还希望我们的中文未来更加进步.

中国和西方关系依然进步了很多, 但是西方还有一部份的人对中国非常不公平.  为了公平我们的目的其实很简单,就想帮中国说话.

中国的历史其实是很长的. 我们觉得中国有很多智慧能帮助现代的问题.  西方人的看法是从他们自己的历史来的.  他们很多事情就想不通.

孔夫子两千年有教过”中庸.”  西方媒体的行为就不够中庸, 所以他们的社会有许多无法解决的问题.

冷战还没过几年, 西方还有一部份的人是用冷战的透镜来看中国的.  这没办法.  只有时间才能解决.

Allen 是哈佛大学毕业的.  我是从麻省理工学院毕业的.  我们俩之间一为是律师,一为是功工程经理.  一为是台湾出生, 一为是福建出生.  我们很小就移民到美国.

我们的心还是中国人的心.

我们不必自大,但我们需要西方和世界给我们一个平等的态度.

上海世博会 2010 (World Expo 2010 in Shanghai) starting in two days

April 29th, 2010 2 comments

The 2010 World Expo will be starting in Shanghai on May 1, 2010 and last through October 31, 2010.  The Boston Globe has a collection of amazing pictures of the preparation as well as footage of the actual venue itself.  The U.S. has spent about $60 million in the construction of its 60,000 square foot pavilion.  This was funded largely by U.S. corporations at the urge of Hilary Clinton.  In all, according to the Boston Globe, $56billion would be spent in Shanghai on behalf of this event (more than the 2008 Beijing Olympics). Ok, that was actually misleading, because bulk of the money went into infrastructure spending to improve the city. This year, the theme is “Better City, Better Life.”  Below is a promotional video showing off Shanghai by the organizers (with world famous pianist, Lang Lang):

Qiao Xinsheng: “How to improve China’s image”

April 27th, 2010 No comments

China Daily recently carried an opinion piece by professor and director, Qiao Xinsheng, of the Social Development Research Center at Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, titled, “How to improve China’s image” [on the world stage.] He was reacting to a an article on the Singapore based Lianhe ZaoBao calling on Chinese leaders to more aggressively defend China’s image abroad to avoid being labeled an “evil empire” as what happened to the former Soviet Union.

How can China improve her image?  There is not a simple answer.  Professor Qiao’s article was short and concise, and he made many great points we feel worthwhile repeating here. Read more…

二泉映月 (Moon Reflected on Second Spring), a modern Chinese classic

April 23rd, 2010 2 comments

If there is a music that can make one’s soul weep, 二泉映月 (Moon Reflected on Second Spring) is it.  It was composed and played by 华彦钧 (Huà Yànjūn), more commonly known as 阿炳 (“Blind” Abing), who lived during one of the most tumultuous periods of modern Chinese history.  Only with the most miserable human condition could someone make this music.  Famous Japanese conductor, Seiji Ozawa was quoted in Chinese, “此曲只应跪听” which means this piece should be heard while kneeling down.
Read more…

China earthquake and natural disaster donation guide

April 21st, 2010 7 comments

One thing that is constant around the world is the occurrence of natural disasters.  Every occurrence, thousands or millions of peoples lives are affected.  Many die.  Many are left homeless.  Many are seriously injured.  Many are permanently handicapped. Still, many are left without a child or a parent.  Our world is full of disasters, and China has unfortunately had a large share.  Below is a listing of the top ten natural disasters around the world:

Rank Event Location Death Toll (Estimate)
1 1931 China floods China 1,000,000 to 2,500,000
2 1887 Yellow River flood China 900,000 to 2,000,000
3 1556 Shaanxi earthquake Shaanxi, China 830,000
4 1970 Bhola cyclone Bangladesh 500,000
5 1839 India Cyclone India 300,000
6 526 Antioch earthquake Byzantine (Turkey) 250,000 to 300,000
7 1976 Tangshan earthquake Hebei, China 242,419
8 1920 Haiyuan earthquake China 234,117
9 2004 Indonesian Tsunami Southeast Asia 230,210
10 2010 Haiti earthquake Haiti 230,000

(source: Wikipedia.org)


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Translation: Chinese Humanitarian Chen Guang Biao and Fellow Air Travellers Donate to Earthquake Victims

April 18th, 2010 1 comment

[Originally published on Foolsmountain] The stories out of Qinghai tell thousands of tragedies but also many small acts of heroism.  Since the story is developing, with people still being saved, and since I am not on the ground: I will refrain from writing or commenting on the disaster.  However, I will try to translate small stories here and there in the coming weeks to give people more of a flavor to what is going on on the ground.

The following is a short story filed by a reporter from Wuhan regarding his experience traveling to Qinghai to cover the earthquake. The story itself may not be a big deal, but it does detail one of the many spontaneous acts of kindred kindness that people across China are showing for the victims of the disaster. Read more…

Social Media – Not a Fad , and Not Anti-China

April 11th, 2010 17 comments

Recently, in light of the stink Google stirred up leaving China, many pundits in the West have opined how the Internet is inherently anti-government, how the Chinese government is too draconian in its control of the Internet, even how the second law of thermodynamics and “freedom” will eventually triumph.

I find by and most these observations to be absurd. Read more…

The U.S. and the Dollar in numbers; how crazy, you decide

April 8th, 2010 8 comments

$1.4 trillion out of thin air

The U.S. government has created out of thin air (“manipulated” into existence if you prefer) $1.4 trillion since September 2008 (around the time of the financial crisis) to March 2010.  (Source: U.S. Fed.) In December 2008, James Grant wrote an article in the WSJ criticizing the Fed “printing like mad … and is the wrong approach with potentially dire consequences.”

What’s the point? Everyone who hold assets denominated in dollar are immediately going to have their wealth diluted in proportion to the amount “printed” (it’s computer based now, and so the physical printing is no longer necessary).  China and Japan are the two largest foreign holders of American debt,  so the value of their holdings decrease.  The vast majority of holders of dollar denominated assets are in fact Americans.  Their purchasing power is now reduced.  Who is “manipulating” who?

Read more…