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Posts Tagged ‘WW2’

What is a Holocaust?

April 1st, 2014 6 comments

Earlier today, I stumbled upon a curious article in the Washington Post titled “This is why Germany doesn’t want China anywhere near Berlin’s holocaust memorial”.  According to the article, President Xi was (in short) barred from visiting German’s Holocaust memorial in Berlin because Germany was worried about embarrassing Japan.

Here is a copy of the article in full:

Chinese President Xi Jinping is in Germany for the next two days, meeting with Chancellor Angela Merkel and other German officials. It’s the third leg of Xi’s European Union trip, and an important one – as Deutsche Welle notes, Germany is China’s most important trade partner in Europe.

There is, however, once place that Xi isn’t wanted during his time in Germany: Berlin’s famous Holocaust memorial. Der Spiegel reported this month that German authorities had refused a request from Xi’s entourage for an official visit to the site. While the Chinese president may visit the site on his own, it will not be a part of the official itinerary and Merkel will not accompany him.

Visits to the Holocaust memorial, officially known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe (Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas), are a key part of a trip to Berlin for many visitors. Why wouldn’t Xi be granted an official visit? Read more…

A Response to a Japan Scholar’s Response: War Loot is Ours to Keep

October 4th, 2012 20 comments

In a recent comment, one of our readers pointed out:

http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/04/the-diaoyusenkaku-islands-a-japanese-scholar-responds/

I thought this is a funny read of a Japanese ‘scholar’ thinks that why ‘Senkaku’ islands belongs to Japan.

I don’t think the conclusion is “funny” at all.  I think it’s “serious.”  Below is a very quick response (sorry, lots of projects due).

Read more…

Categories: Analysis Tags: , , ,

Remembering Nagasaki and Hiroshima, but other victims too

September 17th, 2010 No comments

In 1945, by executive order, U.S. President Harry S. Truman ordered the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  It promptly lead to the surrender of Japan.  Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000–166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,000–80,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day.  (Wikipedia.org)  Those eventual deaths after the first day were no doubt horrific as radiation eventually broke them down.  Every anniversary in early August, this sad past is commemorated, and is a reminder for humanity the dangers of nuclear weapons.  It is also a reminder of what humans are capable of doing to each other.

Following is a letter from a Hidden Harmonies guest, raffiaflower, of a piece written about this commemoration.  Or, rather, there are other victims to commemorate too.
Read more…

China Daily reports, “Japan apologizes for annexation of Korean Peninsula”

August 10th, 2010 2 comments

Japan apologizes for annexation of Korean Peninsula

File photo shows Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan holds a news conference at his official residence in Tokyo July 30, 2010. (Source: China Daily)

China Daily recently reported, “Japan apologizes for annexation of Korean Peninsula.”

I think this is a responsible move on Japan’s part. It is a step forward in reconciliation. Some people argue unless the Japanese take full responsibility for their past atrocities, warming of relations with Japan should not be allowed. That is backwards. I have always said in the past, the warming of relations gives confidence and actually allows both parties to face a difficult past. This is more in tuned with human nature. Of course, this does not mean the past ought to be forgotten.

For the Chinese people, they in fact have shown incredible forbearance. The ultimate lesson of this recent history for us all is to not let it repeat. That should be a goal our generation work towards. If we do not, we are in fact likely sewing the seeds for our future generations to repeat the past. The Chinese government is expanding relations with Japan despite this unresolved history. That is responsible, wise, and admirable.
Read more…