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In view of Sarca-Chinese Characters, My own:

 

 

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  1. raventhorn2000
    August 29th, 2011 at 09:11 | #1

    Alright, I declare myself a Chinese “Artist”.

  2. Charles Liu
    August 29th, 2011 at 10:23 | #2

    Dude for “artist” creds you need an awsome middle finger in there somewhere. Young’uns nowadays don’t know who Pac-Man is.

  3. raventhorn2000
    August 29th, 2011 at 10:33 | #3

    @Charles Liu

    If they don’t know Pac-Man, then I doubt they would understand the references above.

    Even for the Sino-phile-phobes, I doubt they understand the 1st set of characters and what they mean.

    (Even if they manage to translate the 1st set of characters, they might only guess the superficial meaning, and don’t see the underlying 2ndary word-play meaning. I’m certainly not going to explain it to them here).

    🙂

    Let’s see how long they can scratch their heads and figure it out!

  4. raventhorn2000
    August 31st, 2011 at 06:09 | #4

    I’ll give another day or so for the guesses in the meanings of the 1st line.

  5. August 31st, 2011 at 17:31 | #5

    @raventhorn2000
    You want people to try to guess the meaning here in the comments? I could try.

  6. raventhorn2000
    August 31st, 2011 at 18:38 | #6

    Give your shot.

  7. Al
    August 31st, 2011 at 18:46 | #7

    The main idea I got reading the first line is that u are playing with the words 殖民地 or 殖民主义...is it that?

  8. tc
    August 31st, 2011 at 20:14 | #8

    The first line might mean — Democracy, but not “implanted” democracy. The second line, harmony, not harmony defined by US.

    C. Custer can translate better. He lives in China 🙂

  9. Al
    August 31st, 2011 at 20:20 | #9

    I think Raventhorn was mostly referring to the first line…And yes, it’s my idea also that he’s playing with the concept of 殖民主义 (colonialism) and 殖民地 (colony)…like saying “democracy” not “colonial/implanted-democracy”…

  10. September 1st, 2011 at 05:24 | #10

    Yes, I think it’s been said already. Literally, “Democracy, not colonialism”. A more nuanced translation could be “[Native / People’s] Democracy, not [Colonial-style / alien] Pseudo-Democracy”

  11. raventhorn2000
    September 1st, 2011 at 05:24 | #11

    You guys got the 1st connotation in the 1st line, but there is 2nd connotation in the 1st line.

    Keep trying.

  12. September 1st, 2011 at 05:53 | #12

    @raventhorn2000
    “‘Democracy’ won’t breed democracy”? Meaning Western-style “democracy” can’t be transplanted, as it’s not really democracy in the first place?

  13. raventhorn2000
    September 1st, 2011 at 06:13 | #13

    @Sweet & Sour Socialism

    No. keep trying.

  14. raventhorn2000
    September 1st, 2011 at 06:45 | #14

    OK, the answer for the 2nd connotation in the 1st line:

    殖 when used in 殖民主义, is pronounced as “Zhi”, which means, “to transplant”, meaning “colonialism”.

    However, 殖 has a 2ndary context and pronounciation (not often used in Chinese), “Shi”, used in 骨殖 (gǔshi), meaning 尸骨 (corpse and skeleton).

    Thus, 殖-民主, pronounced “Shi – Min Zhu”, would mean “Skeleton – Democracy”, or corpse-democracy, or dead/decaying democracy.

    It plays on the double meaning that 殖-民主 would also mean a transplanted Democracy is not a viable democracy, but a dead democracy.

  15. raventhorn2000
    September 1st, 2011 at 06:53 | #15

    As for the 2nd line,

    “Harmonious” is not “harmonious (where the “mouth” characters are replaced with US flag Pac-Men)”.

    the 1st connotation is Harmonious is not defined by US “Mouths” speaking.

    the 2nd connotation is that arbitrarily altering Chinese “characters” with foreign “symbols” naturally make the Chinese characters look ridiculous, thus Chinese people should not be looking for foreign “equivalents” to determine the true meaning of Chinese “Harmony”.

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